Red Hat: Identity Management Server Setup and HA on RHEL 7

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Introduction

Red Hat Identity Management Server provides is a centralized identity management server for Linux, Mac, Windows.

In this post we are going to setup and configure a HA deployment of Red Hat IDM on two RHEL 7.x servers.

Red Hat Identity Management Server is based on the upstream project, FreeIPA.

Prerequisites

Only a couple of prerequisites for a simple lab setup

  • You need working dns with forward and reverse entries for both IDM servers
  • NSCD needs to be disabled on each IDM server
  • Proper hostname needs to be set on each IDM node (cannot use localhost)
  • IPV6 needs to be enabled, but you do not need to have an IPV6 address on external interfaces

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OpenSCAP Part 3: Running Scans from the Command Line in RHEL 7

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Introduction

In part 1 of this series we were introduced to OpenSCAP and the process of running scans via the SCAP workbench. In part 2, we explored concepts and components that define security/vulnerability scans. In this 3rd post we are going to dive into the command line operation.

Let’s get started with oscap.

Installing oscap

In RHEL 7 oscap can be installed with the following command

# yum -y install scap-security-guide openscap-scanner

Content is installed under the following directory. Note that ssg is short for SCAP Security Guide.

/usr/share/xml/scap/ssg/content

Lets change directories to the one listed above and view the installed files.

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Using oscap we can view more info on each file shown above. In this example we are going to inspect the ssg-rhel7-ds.xml file.

# oscap info ssg-rhel7-ds.xml

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OpenSCAP Part 2: SCAP Content for RHEL 7

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Introduction

In part one of the OpenSCAP series we were introduced to the basic usage of the OpenSCAP toolset. In that post we learned how to run a basic scan via the scap-workbench in a desktop environment.

This post will focus on the Content, Profiles, and Targets.

Content

All content will be installed in the directory shown below.  The content in this directory will vary based on the installed OS (the content on my Fedora differs from RHEL for example).

/usr/share/xml/scap/ssg/content

The screenshot below contains a list of content installed by default on RHEL 7.

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Additional content can be obtained and added to the content directory shown above.  For example, NIST content can be downloaded directly from the NIST website. Link below.

National Checklist Program Repository

In the screenshot below we have performed a search for all content that targets RHEL 7.6

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OpenSCAP Part 1: Introduction and Basic Usage for RHEL 7/CentOS 7/Fedora

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Introduction

OpenSCAP is a standardized compliance solution for Linux. It is comprised of policies (NIST, STIG, etc) and tooling (oscap, scap-workbench) that allow you to scan and evaluate Linux hosts in order to validate their compliance with industry defined standards.

In addition to providing industry standard compliance rules, OpenSCAP also allows administrators to create custom compliance standards using the scap-workbench.

Administrators can then generate remediation files in bash, ansible or puppet.

Let’s get familiar with OpenSCAP below.

Getting Started

Below is an overview of the “Getting Started” workflow. In this workflow we are gonna run through a very simple use-case, scanning your local Fedora workstation.

  1. Install
  2. Choose Policy
  3. Modify/Adjust
  4. Scan
  5. Remediate

In the sections below we will walk through each of these steps in detail.

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Red Hat Satellite 6.x: Restarting Services

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Introduction

Red Hat Satellite consists of a number of running services. Restarting each service manually can be painful. Luckily you can use the commands below to easily restart all services.

List Services

Run the command below to view a list of all Satellite services that are started at boot.

# katello-service list
Redirecting to ‘foreman-maintain service’
Running Service List
========================================================================
List applicable services:
dynflowd.service enabled
foreman-proxy.service enabled
httpd.service enabled
postgresql.service enabled
pulp_celerybeat.service enabled
pulp_resource_manager.service enabled
pulp_streamer.service enabled
pulp_workers.service enabled
puppetserver.service enabled
qdrouterd.service enabled
qpidd.service enabled
rh-mongodb34-mongod.service enabled
smart_proxy_dynflow_core.service enabled
squid.service enabled
tomcat.service enabled

All services listed [OK]

Check Service Status

The command below will check the status of all Satellite services. The output is similar to running a systemctl status on all Satellite specific services. The output can be quite verbose.

# katello-service status

Stop Services

Use the command below to stop all Satellite services.

# katello-service stop

Start Services

Use the command below to start all Satellite services.

# katello-service start

Restart Services

The command below will restart all Satellite services.

# katello-service restart

RHEL7: Install RHV Guest Agent and Drivers

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About the Guest Agent

The RHEL 7.x virtual machine guest agent in RHV 4.x provides  drivers, additional data, and functionality once installed on a RHEL virtual machine.

The guest agent includes:

  • virtio-net paravirtualized network driver
  • virtio-scsi paravirtualized HDD driver
  • virtio-balloon driver which improves memory overcommit (currently not used by RHV)
  • rhevm-guest-agent common which allows RHV to retrieve guest internal information such as IP addresses and allows RHV to gracefully reboot the guest

You can view the entire list here.

When spawning a virtual machine in RHV without the guest agent, a warning will appear as an exclamation mark in RHV.

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Register with Satellite

You can skip this step if your guest is already registered

In order to install the guest agent, I must first register the virtual machine with my local satellite. If not using a local satellite server, you can register with RHN.

First we need to grab the katello rpm from satellite – an insecure satellite server in this case as we are using a self-signed cert.

# curl -Ok https://satellite.lab.localdomain/pub/katello-ca-consumer-latest.noarch.rpm

Then install the rpm.

# rpm -ivh katello-ca-consumer-latest.noarch.rpm

Now register with Satellite. In the example below, we are using a custom activation key and organization.

# subscription-manager register –activationkey=”auburn-lab-ak” –org=”lab”

Installing the Guest Agent

You will need to ensure that the RHEL 7 RH Common repo is enabled. If the repo is not available to the guest, you will need to enable.

# yum repolist | grep common
!rhel-7-server-rh-common-rpms/7Server/x86_64 Red Hat Enterprise Linux 234

If the proper repo is enabled, then run the following command.

Once installed, the orange exclamation point will disappear.

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Start and Enable the Guest Agent Service

# systemctl enable ovirt-guest-agent.service
# systemctl start ovirt-guest-agent.service

Red Hat Satellite: Create and Publish Content Views for RHEL + OpenStack

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Overview

In this post I will review the process of creating Content Views (CV), Composite Content Views (CCV), publishing each view, and creating lifecycles.

Note that in this post we are working with Red Hat Satellite 6.4, in which there was a major overhaul of the WebUI. You may have noticed that all menus are now situated on in a pane on the left, rather than at the top of each page.

Sync Plans

A sync plan is a constant, scheduled synchronization of updates of a Red Hat Satellite repository and the source repositories. I suggest syncing either daily or weekly in order to minimize the deltas between each sync. When you sync more often, the amount of change between syncs is less and therefore should complete faster than a monthly sync.

Note that this step assumes that you have already setup the correct repositories for RHEL and Red Hat OpenStack.  A list of required repositories can be found in the Red Hat OpenStack Director Installation and Usage Guide.

Navigate to Content > Sync Plans

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Here we create a daily sync plan for RHEL 7.

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We now add RHEL 7 as the product.

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Now we need to create a daily sync plan for Red Hat OpenStack.

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Note: you might need to create a sync plan for Ceph as well.  Ensure all plans sync at the same interval.

Create a Content View

Now we need to create our content views. We will create one for RHEL, and one for OSP. If you are using ceph, you will need to create a content view for it as well.

 

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