Red Hat: Identity Management Server Setup and HA on RHEL 7

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Introduction

Red Hat Identity Management Server provides is a centralized identity management server for Linux, Mac, Windows.

In this post we are going to setup and configure a HA deployment of Red Hat IDM on two RHEL 7.x servers.

Red Hat Identity Management Server is based on the upstream project, FreeIPA.

Prerequisites

Only a couple of prerequisites for a simple lab setup

  • You need working dns with forward and reverse entries for both IDM servers
  • NSCD needs to be disabled on each IDM server
  • Proper hostname needs to be set on each IDM node (cannot use localhost)
  • IPV6 needs to be enabled, but you do not need to have an IPV6 address on external interfaces

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OpenSCAP Part 3: Running Scans from the Command Line in RHEL 7

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Introduction

In part 1 of this series we were introduced to OpenSCAP and the process of running scans via the SCAP workbench. In part 2, we explored concepts and components that define security/vulnerability scans. In this 3rd post we are going to dive into the command line operation.

Let’s get started with oscap.

Installing oscap

In RHEL 7 oscap can be installed with the following command

# yum -y install scap-security-guide openscap-scanner

Content is installed under the following directory. Note that ssg is short for SCAP Security Guide.

/usr/share/xml/scap/ssg/content

Lets change directories to the one listed above and view the installed files.

Screenshot from 2019-07-24 15-58-04

Using oscap we can view more info on each file shown above. In this example we are going to inspect the ssg-rhel7-ds.xml file.

# oscap info ssg-rhel7-ds.xml

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OpenSCAP Part 2: SCAP Content for RHEL 7

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Introduction

In part one of the OpenSCAP series we were introduced to the basic usage of the OpenSCAP toolset. In that post we learned how to run a basic scan via the scap-workbench in a desktop environment.

This post will focus on the Content, Profiles, and Targets.

Content

All content will be installed in the directory shown below.  The content in this directory will vary based on the installed OS (the content on my Fedora differs from RHEL for example).

/usr/share/xml/scap/ssg/content

The screenshot below contains a list of content installed by default on RHEL 7.

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Additional content can be obtained and added to the content directory shown above.  For example, NIST content can be downloaded directly from the NIST website. Link below.

National Checklist Program Repository

In the screenshot below we have performed a search for all content that targets RHEL 7.6

Screenshot from 2019-07-25 11-45-44.png

 

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OpenSCAP Part 1: Introduction and Basic Usage for RHEL 7/CentOS 7/Fedora

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Introduction

OpenSCAP is a standardized compliance solution for Linux. It is comprised of policies (NIST, STIG, etc) and tooling (oscap, scap-workbench) that allow you to scan and evaluate Linux hosts in order to validate their compliance with industry defined standards.

In addition to providing industry standard compliance rules, OpenSCAP also allows administrators to create custom compliance standards using the scap-workbench.

Administrators can then generate remediation files in bash, ansible or puppet.

Let’s get familiar with OpenSCAP below.

Getting Started

Below is an overview of the “Getting Started” workflow. In this workflow we are gonna run through a very simple use-case, scanning your local Fedora workstation.

  1. Install
  2. Choose Policy
  3. Modify/Adjust
  4. Scan
  5. Remediate

In the sections below we will walk through each of these steps in detail.

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Monitor Tripplite UPS on RHEL 7 via NUT

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One of the UPS’s in my home lab is a Tripplite 1500VALCD. I wanted to be able to monitor/manage the UPS via RHEL/Centos however Tripplite no longer makes a Linux version of Power Alert Local for Linux.  Instead I decided to use Nut.

After connecting a USB cable between my RHEL server and my UPS, I needed to install lsusb to verify that it was detected properly.
# yum -y install usbutils

I was then able to verify connectivity

# lsusb | grep -i trip
Bus 003 Device 123: ID 09ae:2012 Tripp Lite

Nut can be found in the EPEL repo which I needed to install.

#wget https://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/epel-release-latest-7.noarch.rpm
# yum localinstall epel-release-latest-7.noarch.rpm

Then install Nut.

# yum -y install nut.x86_64

I then ran nut-monitor to detect the proper config for Nut.

[nutdev1]
driver = “usbhid-ups”
port = “auto”
vendorid = “09AE”
productid = “2012”
product = “Tripp Lite UPS”
vendor = “Tripp Lite”
bus = “003”

Use the output from the above command to populate /etc/ups/ups.conf. In the example below I I only changed the name of the device.

[tripplite]
driver = “usbhid-ups”
port = “auto”
vendorid = “09AE”
productid = “2012”
product = “Tripp Lite UPS”
vendor = “Tripp Lite”
bus = “003”

I then started and enabled the following services.

# systemctl start nut-server
# systemctl enable nut-server

I was then able to run upsc and query the ups.

# upsc tripplite
battery.charge: 100
battery.runtime: 620
battery.type: PbAC
battery.voltage: 26.3
battery.voltage.nominal: 24.0
device.mfr: Tripp Lite
device.model: Tripp Lite UPS
device.type: ups
driver.name: usbhid-ups
driver.parameter.bus: 003
driver.parameter.pollfreq: 30
driver.parameter.pollinterval: 2
driver.parameter.port: auto
driver.parameter.product: Tripp Lite UPS
driver.parameter.productid: 2012
driver.parameter.vendor: Tripp Lite
driver.parameter.vendorid: 09AE
driver.version: 2.7.2
driver.version.data: TrippLite HID 0.81
driver.version.internal: 0.38
input.frequency: 59.8
input.voltage: 112.2
input.voltage.nominal: 120
output.frequency.nominal: 60
output.voltage: 112.2
output.voltage.nominal: 120
ups.beeper.status: disabled
ups.delay.shutdown: 20
ups.load: 48
ups.mfr: Tripp Lite
ups.model: Tripp Lite UPS
ups.power: 0.0
ups.power.nominal: 1500
ups.productid: 2012
ups.status: OL
ups.test.result: Done and error
ups.timer.reboot: 65535
ups.timer.shutdown: 65535
ups.vendorid: 09ae
ups.watchdog.status: 0

Next I plan to explore nut-monitor, but for know I can at least query the UPS. Apparently the battery is dead.

Cockpit for Centos and RHEL 7: Install and Configure

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Introduction

I have recently purchased 3 Dell servers, and put myself to task to build out a new lab. My old lab was in desperate need of updating as I had long past the time when 48GB of memory per node was sufficient. The cost of memory, old or new was not even closely in line with cheap server grade CPUs that were perfect for lab servers. Today you can buy a used E7540, a low power, 12 core (HT enabled) Xeon for less than $30 (USD) from a reputable retailer. Cram two of these into an 11 gen Dell and you are in business.

So, three new (to me) Dell rackmounts, deployed as virtualization servers, and I want a simple way to view performance stats in a nice clean single pain of glass. I am not in any way shape or form looking to build fancy dashboard and setup any sort of historical monitoring. I just want to know where the performance hot spots are when my environment seems to be running slowly.

I installed Cockpit before on a laptop or two and thought it might foot the bill, especially since you could use one dashboard for multiple nodes.

So here we are going to deploy Cockpit on all three nodes, on each the steps are the same.

Prerequisites

First we must open a firewall port on each node.

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Configure RHEL7/Centos 7 as a Virtualization Host

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This is a fresh install of RHEL 7.5

First install the packages as shown below.


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yum install qemu-kvm libvirt

Now install the additional recommened virtualization packages


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# yum install virt-install libvirt-python virt-manager virt-install libvirt-client 

Now restart libvirtd


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# systemctl restart libvirtd

 
Now you should be able to launch virt-manager from your remote machine and add a connection to your new virtualization host.

Special note. Make sure that you disable NetworkManager


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# systemctl stop NetworkManager
# systemctl disable NetworkManager