Monitor Tripplite UPS on RHEL 7 via NUT

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One of the UPS’s in my home lab is a Tripplite 1500VALCD. I wanted to be able to monitor/manage the UPS via RHEL/Centos however Tripplite no longer makes a Linux version of Power Alert Local for Linux.  Instead I decided to use Nut.

After connecting a USB cable between my RHEL server and my UPS, I needed to install lsusb to verify that it was detected properly.
# yum -y install usbutils

I was then able to verify connectivity

# lsusb | grep -i trip
Bus 003 Device 123: ID 09ae:2012 Tripp Lite

Nut can be found in the EPEL repo which I needed to install.

#wget https://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/epel-release-latest-7.noarch.rpm
# yum localinstall epel-release-latest-7.noarch.rpm

Then install Nut.

# yum -y install nut.x86_64

I then ran nut-monitor to detect the proper config for Nut.

[nutdev1]
driver = “usbhid-ups”
port = “auto”
vendorid = “09AE”
productid = “2012”
product = “Tripp Lite UPS”
vendor = “Tripp Lite”
bus = “003”

Use the output from the above command to populate /etc/ups/ups.conf. In the example below I I only changed the name of the device.

[tripplite]
driver = “usbhid-ups”
port = “auto”
vendorid = “09AE”
productid = “2012”
product = “Tripp Lite UPS”
vendor = “Tripp Lite”
bus = “003”

I then started and enabled the following services.

# systemctl start nut-server
# systemctl enable nut-server

I was then able to run upsc and query the ups.

# upsc tripplite
battery.charge: 100
battery.runtime: 620
battery.type: PbAC
battery.voltage: 26.3
battery.voltage.nominal: 24.0
device.mfr: Tripp Lite
device.model: Tripp Lite UPS
device.type: ups
driver.name: usbhid-ups
driver.parameter.bus: 003
driver.parameter.pollfreq: 30
driver.parameter.pollinterval: 2
driver.parameter.port: auto
driver.parameter.product: Tripp Lite UPS
driver.parameter.productid: 2012
driver.parameter.vendor: Tripp Lite
driver.parameter.vendorid: 09AE
driver.version: 2.7.2
driver.version.data: TrippLite HID 0.81
driver.version.internal: 0.38
input.frequency: 59.8
input.voltage: 112.2
input.voltage.nominal: 120
output.frequency.nominal: 60
output.voltage: 112.2
output.voltage.nominal: 120
ups.beeper.status: disabled
ups.delay.shutdown: 20
ups.load: 48
ups.mfr: Tripp Lite
ups.model: Tripp Lite UPS
ups.power: 0.0
ups.power.nominal: 1500
ups.productid: 2012
ups.status: OL
ups.test.result: Done and error
ups.timer.reboot: 65535
ups.timer.shutdown: 65535
ups.vendorid: 09ae
ups.watchdog.status: 0

Next I plan to explore nut-monitor, but for know I can at least query the UPS. Apparently the battery is dead.

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Cockpit for Centos and RHEL 7: Install and Configure

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Introduction

I have recently purchased 3 Dell servers, and put myself to task to build out a new lab. My old lab was in desperate need of updating as I had long past the time when 48GB of memory per node was sufficient. The cost of memory, old or new was not even closely in line with cheap server grade CPUs that were perfect for lab servers. Today you can buy a used E7540, a low power, 12 core (HT enabled) Xeon for less than $30 (USD) from a reputable retailer. Cram two of these into an 11 gen Dell and you are in business.

So, three new (to me) Dell rackmounts, deployed as virtualization servers, and I want a simple way to view performance stats in a nice clean single pain of glass. I am not in any way shape or form looking to build fancy dashboard and setup any sort of historical monitoring. I just want to know where the performance hot spots are when my environment seems to be running slowly.

I installed Cockpit before on a laptop or two and thought it might foot the bill, especially since you could use one dashboard for multiple nodes.

So here we are going to deploy Cockpit on all three nodes, on each the steps are the same.

Prerequisites

First we must open a firewall port on each node.

Continue reading

Configure RHEL7/Centos 7 as a Virtualization Host

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This is a fresh install of RHEL 7.5

First install the packages as shown below.


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yum install qemu-kvm libvirt

Now install the additional recommened virtualization packages


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# yum install virt-install libvirt-python virt-manager virt-install libvirt-client 

Now restart libvirtd


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# systemctl restart libvirtd

 
Now you should be able to launch virt-manager from your remote machine and add a connection to your new virtualization host.

Special note. Make sure that you disable NetworkManager


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# systemctl stop NetworkManager
# systemctl disable NetworkManager