Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13: five things you need to know about networking

via Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13: five things you need to know about networking

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Virtualize your OpenStack control plane with Red Hat Virtualization and Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13

via Virtualize your OpenStack control plane with Red Hat Virtualization and Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13

Linux: How to start a Minecraft server at boot via Systemd

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I am not into Minecraft, but my kids are.

I decided to local host a small Minecraft server on a RHEL 7 vm.  There are tons of guides on how to install Minecraft on Linux, but I did not find much of anything that details how to get the software to start at boot-time via systemd.

Below are the steps that I took. These instructions should work on RHEL 6/7, Centos 6/7, or any other Linux that utilizes systemd for starting services.

Change directory to the systemd directory.

# cd /etc/systemd/system

Create a systemd service file using your favorite text editor. Mine is called minecraft.service.

[root@minecraft system]# cat minecraft.service
[Unit]
Description=Start Minecraft
After=network.target

[Service]
Type=simple
ExecStart=/root/start_minecraft_server.bash
TimeoutStartSec=0

[Install]
WantedBy=default.target

Make the systemd script executable.

# chmod +x /etc/systemd/system/minecraft.service

Next, create a startup script. Again use your favorite text editor. In the example above, systemd is configured to run the script “/root/start_minecraft_server.bash”. We now need to create that script. Its contents are below.

#!/bin/bash

#Standard Minecraft
cd /home/mcserver/minecraft
exec java -Xmx2048M -Xms2048M -jar minecraft_server.1.12.2.jar nogui

Make the script above executable.

#chmod +x /root/start_minecraft_server.bash

Now reload systemd.

# systemctl daemon-reload

Enable and start your service

#systemctl enable minecraft.service

#systemctl start minecraft.service

OpenStack 10 (Newton) Lab Installation and Configuration Guide

How to deploy a simple OSP 10 POC/lab environment using Packstack (non-director deploy.

Source: OpenStack 10 (Newton) Lab Installation and Configuration Guide

Driving in the Fast Lane: Huge Page support in OpenStack Compute

arger page sizes there is also an increased potential for memory to be wasted as processes must allocate memory in pages but not all of the memory on the page may actually be required.

Source: Driving in the Fast Lane: Huge Page support in OpenStack Compute