Red Hat Satellite 6.x: Restarting Services

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Introduction

Red Hat Satellite consists of a number of running services. Restarting each service manually can be painful. Luckily you can use the commands below to easily restart all services.

List Services

Run the command below to view a list of all Satellite services that are started at boot.

# katello-service list
Redirecting to ‘foreman-maintain service’
Running Service List
========================================================================
List applicable services:
dynflowd.service enabled
foreman-proxy.service enabled
httpd.service enabled
postgresql.service enabled
pulp_celerybeat.service enabled
pulp_resource_manager.service enabled
pulp_streamer.service enabled
pulp_workers.service enabled
puppetserver.service enabled
qdrouterd.service enabled
qpidd.service enabled
rh-mongodb34-mongod.service enabled
smart_proxy_dynflow_core.service enabled
squid.service enabled
tomcat.service enabled

All services listed [OK]

Check Service Status

The command below will check the status of all Satellite services. The output is similar to running a systemctl status on all Satellite specific services. The output can be quite verbose.

# katello-service status

Stop Services

Use the command below to stop all Satellite services.

# katello-service stop

Start Services

Use the command below to start all Satellite services.

# katello-service start

Restart Services

The command below will restart all Satellite services.

# katello-service restart

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Red Hat Satellite: Create and Publish Content Views for RHEL + OpenStack

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Overview

In this post I will review the process of creating Content Views (CV), Composite Content Views (CCV), publishing each view, and creating lifecycles.

Note that in this post we are working with Red Hat Satellite 6.4, in which there was a major overhaul of the WebUI. You may have noticed that all menus are now situated on in a pane on the left, rather than at the top of each page.

Sync Plans

A sync plan is a constant, scheduled synchronization of updates of a Red Hat Satellite repository and the source repositories. I suggest syncing either daily or weekly in order to minimize the deltas between each sync. When you sync more often, the amount of change between syncs is less and therefore should complete faster than a monthly sync.

Note that this step assumes that you have already setup the correct repositories for RHEL and Red Hat OpenStack.  A list of required repositories can be found in the Red Hat OpenStack Director Installation and Usage Guide.

Navigate to Content > Sync Plans

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Here we create a daily sync plan for RHEL 7.

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We now add RHEL 7 as the product.

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Now we need to create a daily sync plan for Red Hat OpenStack.

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Note: you might need to create a sync plan for Ceph as well.  Ensure all plans sync at the same interval.

Create a Content View

Now we need to create our content views. We will create one for RHEL, and one for OSP. If you are using ceph, you will need to create a content view for it as well.

 

Continue reading

Redhat Satellite 5: How to Clone Security Errata to a Software Channel

space_dogFirst check to see if the errata is available to your local satellite server. To accomplish this log into your organizations satellite server and click on the “Errata” tab. Then on the left side of the page click on “Advanced Search”.

In the search box enter the RHSA number (Redhat Security Advisory Number) for the errata that you want to clone/update. In this example I am searching for RHSA-2014:1924, which is a Thunderbird security update.

If your search does not return any results, you will need to manually sync your local Satellite Server with Redhat.To accomplish this you need to ssh into your local satellite server and run the command shown below. Note that this does not update any packages/errata. This does update the list of availbile packages/errata.

/usr/bin/satellite-sync
[root@myserver ~]# satellite-sync –email
10:08:09 Red Hat Satellite – live synchronization
10:08:09 url: https://satellite.rhn.redhat.com
10:08:09 debug/output level: 1
….truncated….

Once you are able to locate the specific fix in via “Erratum Search” you may proceed to the next step. In this example, as I stated above, I am searching for RHSA-2014:1924.

clone_erratta

Now that our local Satellite server is aware of our specific errata, click on “Clone Errata” on the left side of the page. Search the page “Errata Management” for the specific fix that you want to apply. Note that the “Errata Management” page does have built in search functionality — don’t ask me why — so you must search using your browser’s own page search function.

clone_thunderbird

Once you have located the correct Security Advisory, put a check in the box and spend about 5 minutes scrolling down to the bottom of the page. Stop when your arm is tired, or once you locate the “Clone Errata” button. Obviously you want to click this.

Note that your newly added and updated errata/package may not become immediatley availible to install. You nay need to run the following commands to refresh/reload your repos.

#yum clean all

Then check for updates with the command below.

#yum check-update

Enabling Remote Command Execution in Redhat Satellite

9i4b57pkTAs many of you know, a very useful feature of Redhat Satellite is the ability to execute remote commands on a set of servers. You pick a set of servers and plug in your command and schedule the job. Most of the time these remote commands run just fine, however they can error out if the server is not configured to allow remote command execution. Let’s discuss how to fix this.

If remote command execution is not allowed, you will probably see an error similar to those shown below,

Local permission not set for action type script.run

or

Invalid function call attempted

Note that these two error messages usually mean the same thing. You need to enable remote command execution on the remote server.

First off you need to make sure that the command rhn-actions-control is installed. If it is not then we first figure out which rpm provides the command. You can do so with the command below

# yum whatprovides */rhn-actions-control

Now that we know what to install, lets install it.

# yum -y install rhncfg-actions

Now we enable remote command execution

# rhn-actions-control –enable-all

Now you should be able to reschedule your job against the server via the webUI.

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