OpenStack: Configuring SR-IOV in RHEL OSP 8

openstack

Introduction

This article documents the configuration used to configure SR-IOV in OSP 8/Liberty on Dell hardware

Compute Node Configuration

This section will outline the changes needed to configure SR-IOV on each Compute Node.

Bios Configuration on Dell Compute Nodes

First, you will need to ssh to the drac of each Compute Node. Then, type the command below to enter racadm command line.

#racadm

Type the command below to enable SRIOV.

#racadm set BIOS.IntegratedDevices.SriovGlobalEnable Enabled
[Key=BIOS.Setup.1-1#IntegratedDevices]
RAC1017: Successfully modified the object value and the change is in
pending state.
To apply modified value, create a configuration job and reboot
the system. To create the commit and reboot jobs, use “jobqueue”
command. For more information about the “jobqueue” command, see RACADM
help.

Type the command below to verify your configuration.

#racadm>>get BIOS.IntegratedDevices.SriovGlobalEnable

racadm get BIOS.IntegratedDevices.SriovGlobalEnable
[Key=BIOS.Setup.1-1#IntegratedDevices]
SriovGlobalEnable=Enabled

If the server already has an OS, reboot it to make these settings stick. If it doesn’t, use these racadm commands to power cycle.

#racadm serveraction powerdown
#racadm serveraction powerup

Grub Configuration on Compute Nodes

Add “intel_iommu=on” to the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX line as shown below.

# cat /etc/default/grub
GRUB_TIMEOUT=5
GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=”$(sed ‘s, release .*$,,g’ /etc/system-release)”
GRUB_DEFAULT=saved
GRUB_DISABLE_SUBMENU=true
GRUB_TERMINAL_OUTPUT=”console”
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=”console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8 crashkernel=auto rhgb quiet intel_iommu=on”
GRUB_DISABLE_RECOVERY=”true”
audit=1

First, make a backup of /etc/default/grub.

# cp -p /etc/default/grub /etc/default/grub/.$(date +%F_%R)

Edit the line below.

“GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=\”console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8 crashkernel=auto rhgb quiet\”

Change it to this.

“GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX=\”console=tty0 console=ttyS0,115200n8 crashkernel=auto rhgb quiet intel_iommu=on\”

Now, rebuild GRUB config as shown below.

# grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg

Specify the number of VFs to Create in rc.local

Add the following line to /etc/rc.d/rc.local, adjusting for the device name and #VFs. In this instance, our physical adapters each support 32 VFs.

echo 32 > /sys/class/net/<device>/device/sriov_numvfs

For example:

# echo 32 > /sys/class/net/p1p1/device/sriov_numvfs
# echo 32 > /sys/class/net/p3p1/device/sriov_numvfs

Also,ensure the correct SELinux context is restored.

# restorecon -R -v /etc/rc.d/rc.local

Ensure that /etc/rc.d/rc.local is executable.

#chmod +x /etc/rc.d/rc.local

Whitelist PCI devices nova-compute (Compute)

Tell nova-compute which pci devices are allowed to be passed through. Edit the file /etc/nova/nova.conf:

[default]
pci_passthrough_whitelist = [{“vendor_id”:”8086″,”product_id”:”154d”}][{“devname”:”p1p1″,”physical_network”:”sriov_net1″},{“devname”:”p3p1″,”physical_network”:”sriov_net2″}]

This tells nova that all VFs belonging to the physical interface, “p1p1“, are allowed to be passed through to VMs and belong to the neutron provider network “sriov_net1” and all VFs belonging to the physical interface, “p3p1“, are allowed to be passed through for the network “sriov_net2“.

Restart nova-compute on each compute node with the command shown below.

#systemctl restart openstack-nova-compute

Install and Enable Neutron Sriov-Agent (Compute)

Note that the sriov-agent is not required, however, we are going to install and configure it anyway.

Install the following rpm.

# yum -y install openstack-neutron-sriov-nic-agent

Now, on each compute node edit the file /etc/neutron/plugins/ml2/ml2_conf_sriov.ini:

[securitygroup]
firewall_driver = neutron.agent.firewall.NoopFirewallDriver

[sriov_nic]
physical_device_mappings = sriov_net1:p1p1,sriov_net2:p3p1

Now enable and start the nic agent.

# systemctl enable neutron-sriov-nic-agent.service && systemctl start neutron-sriov-nic-agent.service

Controller Node Configuration

Perform the following steps on each Controller Node. Note we will modify Nova and Neutron config files.

Neutron-Server changes in /etc/neutron/plugins/ml2/ml2_conf.ini(Controller)

The following changes take place in the file /etc/neutron/plugins/ml2/ml2_conf.ini.

Add sriovnicswitch as mechanism driver.

mechanism_drivers =openvswitch,bsn_ml2,sriovnicswitch

Set type_drivers to vlan as shown below.

type_drivers = vlan

Set tenant_network_types to vlan.

tenant_network_types = vlan

Set flat_networks as shown below where “sriov_net1” and “sriov_net2” are the networks we are going to create.

flat_networks =datacentre,sriov_net1,sriov_net2

Add VLAN ranges for the SRIOV networks to the network_vlan_ranges line as shown below.

network_vlan_ranges =datacentre:10:100,datacentre:101:122,sriov_net1:200:300,sriov_net1:200:300

Neutron-Server changes in /etc/neutron/plugins/ml2/ml2_conf_sriov.ini(Controller)

The change below needs to be made in /etc/neutron/plugins/ml2/ml2_conf_sriov.ini on each controller

Update the /etc/neutron/plugins/ml2/ml2_conf_sriov.ini on each controller.
In our case,the vendor_id is 8086 and the product_id is 10ed.

supported_pci_vendor_devs = 8086:10ed

Modify Nuetron-Server Startup

Edit /usr/lib/systemd/system/neutron-server.service. Here we add –config-file /etc/neutron/plugins/ml2/ml2_conf_sriov.ini to the ExecStart line. See example below.

# cat neutron-server.service
[Unit]
Description=OpenStack Neutron Server
After=syslog.target network.target

[Service]
Type=notify
User=neutron
ExecStart=/usr/bin/neutron-server –config-file /usr/share/neutron/neutron-dist.conf –config-dir /usr/share/neutron/server –config-file /etc/neutron/neutron.conf –config-file /etc/neutron/plugin.ini –config-file /etc/neutron/plugins/ml2/ml2_conf_sriov.ini –config-dir /etc/neutron/conf.d/common –config-dir /etc/neutron/conf.d/neutron-server –log-file /var/log/neutron/server.log
PrivateTmp=true
NotifyAccess=all
KillMode=process

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Restart neutron on the controllers via pacemaker. See command below.

#pcs resource restart neutron-server-clone

Configure nova-scheduler (Controller)

On every controller node running nova-scheduler add PCIDeviceScheduler to the scheduler_default_filters parameter.

Also  add a new line for scheduler_available_filters parameter under the [default] section in /etc/nova/nova.conf.

[DEFAULT]
scheduler_default_filters = RetryFilter, AvailabilityZoneFilter, RamFilter, ComputeFilter, ComputeCapabilitiesFilter, ImagePropertiesFilter, ServerGroupAntiAffinityFilter, ServerGroupAffinityFilter, PciPassthroughFilter
scheduler_available_filters = nova.scheduler.filters.all_filters
scheduler_available_filters = nova.scheduler.filters.pci_passthrough_filter.PciPassthroughFilter

Now restart nova-scheduler via Pacemaker as shown below.

# pcs resource restart openstack-nova-scheduler-clone

 

Reference

http://docs.openstack.org/liberty/networking-guide/adv-config-sriov.html

OpenStack Ironic Troubleshooting – Neutron Port in Use

keyboard-key-board-melt-broken-computer_p

Ran into issues with a deploy via RHEL OSP director, which caused our heat stack scale compute scale-out to fail.

We corrected the issue, and then attempted our deploy again. This time around, we were able to scale out by several compute nodes. However, several nodes failed to deploy properly.

After trudging through the logs for a bit we were able to find the error below in /var/log/nova-conductor.log

2016-07-25 18:34:39.453 27374 ERROR nova.scheduler.utils [req-1caa3ca0-9e13-4340-b8b2-80b1cf2f8a7f 8408462bd5a8445c9742ea4dfbc20d70 cc44dc9e68064e64899697ac610c8f06 – – -] [instance: e44e3a04-a47e-4a8e-9eb5-0037c1175e4d] Error from last host: fatmin.lab.localdomain (node c5177fbf-ae0f-49db-94f4-087537b3dd53): [u’Traceback (most recent call last):\n’, u’ File “/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/nova/compute/manager.py”, line 1905, in _do_build_and_run_instance\n filter_properties)\n’, u’ File “/usr/lib/python2.7/site-packages/nova/compute/manager.py”, line 2058, in _build_and_run_instance\n instance_uuid=instance.uuid, reason=six.text_type(e))\n’, u’RescheduledException: Build of instance e44e3a04-a47e-4a8e-9eb5-0037c1175e4d was re-scheduled: Port 14:18:77:3e:1a:bf is still in use.\n’]

To resolve we ran the following command, using the MAC address shown above to narrow down the search.

#neutron port-list | grep “14:18:77:3e:1a:bf”
| 25a366df-1e6c-4eb8-853c-5b7db82637f0 | | 14:18:77:3e:1a:bf | {“subnet_id”: “0310f210-63ad-4616-9338-d59ac13cc0be”, “ip_address”: “10.20.0.134”} |

The command “neutron port show“, showed us that this port was down and was not responding to ping.

We then deleted the port via neutron

#neutron port-delete 25a366df-1e6c-4eb8-853c-5b7db82637f0

We then re-ran our deploy and were able to scale without issue.

 

Red Hat Openstack & Big Cloud Fabric Introduction

BSN-Logo-color

 

Big Cloud Fabric, is a SDN solution from Big Switch Networks, designed to integrate into OpenStack (or VMware).

Via OpenStack, BCF (Big Cloud Fabric) integrates directly into OpenStack Neutron by way of a plugin. BCF supports L2/L3 networking and L4-7 insertion. BCF runs on whitebox, or brightbox hardware.

Below are a couple of videos that will give you a high-level view of the solution and let you see it in action.

Red Hat & Big Switch: Integrated OpenStack Solution for Simplified Cloud Deployment:

Webinar – Unified P+V Networking for OpenStack Clouds:

 

You can also access the Big Switch Labs and play around with the techology via the link below. Note that you will have to provide an email address.

http://labs.bigswitch.com/home

 

Stack_Stat: A Simple OpenStack Service Checking Function

openstack

Looking for a simple way to see what OpenStack services are enabled, running, or dead on an OpenStack Compute or Controller Node, and also want to see when these services were started? Then check out this simple function that you can add to root’s .bashrc. Note that I do not take credit for writing this (did modify it a tiny bit, however), rather it is something a friend of mine passed on to me and I found it too handy not to document and share.

First append the following to /root/.bashrc.

##Stack Stat Function
function stack_stat {
services=$( systemctl list-unit-files | egrep '(openstack|neutron)' |awk '{print $1}')
for service in $services ;do
echo -n "$service: "
systemctl status $service |grep Active
done
}

What this function does is show you the status or “Active” (or enabled as you would traditionally say) OpenStack Services. Just run the following…

#stack_stat

You will see something similar to the output below, which shows you each enabled OpenStack service and its running status.

# stack_stat
neutron-dhcp-agent.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:19 EDT; 3 days ago
neutron-l3-agent.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:19 EDT; 3 days ago
neutron-lbaas-agent.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:17 EDT; 3 days ago
neutron-metadata-agent.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:17 EDT; 3 days ago
neutron-metering-agent.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:17 EDT; 3 days ago
neutron-netns-cleanup.service: Active: inactive (dead)
neutron-openvswitch-agent.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:19 EDT; 3 days ago
neutron-ovs-cleanup.service: Active: active (exited) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:19 EDT; 3 days ago
neutron-server.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:29 EDT; 3 days ago
openstack-ceilometer-alarm-evaluator.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:17 EDT; 3 days ago
openstack-ceilometer-alarm-notifier.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:17 EDT; 3 days ago
openstack-ceilometer-api.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:17 EDT; 3 days ago
openstack-ceilometer-central.service: Active: active (running) since Fri 2015-07-10 09:35:17 EDT; 3 days ago

Now compare the output above to the output of “openstack-service status” as shown below. Note that you do not get time and date stamps.

# openstack-service status
neutron-dhcp-agent (pid 6725) is active
neutron-l3-agent (pid 6724) is active
neutron-lbaas-agent (pid 3884) is active
neutron-metadata-agent (pid 3886) is active
neutron-metering-agent (pid 3882) is active
neutron-openvswitch-agent (pid 6726) is active
neutron-server (pid 3885) is active
openstack-ceilometer-alarm-evaluator (pid 3899) is active
openstack-ceilometer-alarm-notifier (pid 3897) is active
openstack-ceilometer-api (pid 3898) is active
openstack-ceilometer-central (pid 3895) is active
openstack-ceilometer-collector (pid 3893) is active
openstack-ceilometer-notification (pid 3890) is active

I know not a huge difference, but it’s still somewhat handy.